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Northern Lights

from $4,315

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One to tick off your bucket list!

Cruise across the Arctic Circle in search of the Northern Lights, Norway's spectacular natural light show which never ceases to amaze. We've increased your chances of a sighting with overnight stays in Tromsø and Alta, plus an included Northern Lights excursion spent around the campfire will guarantee a memorable tale to tell when you get home. Saga Pearl II will also visit a collection of quaint ports, including a first for Saga cruising, Harstad, from where you can set off on an exciting sea safari.

Inspiring experiences to enjoy… Seeking out the amazing Northern Lights and embarking on thrilling wildlife sea safaris.

Saga price includes...

  • A Northern Lights excursion worth £150
  • Complimentary Arctic jacket
  • All meals on board, including 24-hour room service
  • A choice of wines at lunch and dinner
  • All on-board gratuities
  • Optional travel insurance and additional cancellation rights, or a reduction if not required
  • Entertainment and activities
  • Welcome cocktail party and Captain’s dinner
  • All port taxes and visas
  • UK mainland travel service to and from Portsmouth

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Destination 1

Bergen, Norway

Bergen, Norway

Wake to thrilling views of mountains and glimpses of glittering fjords—the waterside city of Bergen is the gateway to Norway’s fjords and enjoys a truly spectacular setting. There has been a settlement here since the 11th century and the colorful, gabled buildings of Bryggen— originally built by medieval German merchants and now a UNESCO World Heritage Site— stand as testament to its fascinating and successful trading history. Away from the waterfront, Norway’s second city has plenty to explore from the landmark 12th-century St Mary’s Church; several interesting museums; and the notable fortress, to the fascinating fish market. History is not the city’s only draw—the funicular railway to the summit of Mount Fløyen or the cable car up to Mount Ulriken Bergen reward visitors with stunning panoramas, while several art galleries offer visual stimulation and beauty of a different kind.

Arrive 0800. Depart 1600.

Destination 2

Molde, Norway

Molde, Norway

Nicknamed the “Town of Roses”, the Norwegian city of Molde is situated on the Romsdal Peninsula, surrounded by two picturesque fjords. An important trading post in the Middle Ages, Molde was once the center of the textile and garment industry in Norway but, after extensive destruction during World War II, it was rebuilt into a vibrant, modern city offering diverse employment and plenty of activities for tourists, from skiing and ice climbing in the winter to fishing, hiking, and rock climbing in the summer months. With ties to four well-known Norwegian authors, including Henrik Ibsen, the town has a strong literary connection and is fiercely proud of its local sons. Architecturally, Molde and the area around it is quintessential Norway, with its colorful houses, quaint fishing villages, and friendly natives. Visitors will find plenty to do outdoors but should also consider visits to the excellent Romsdal Museum for a look at the town’s history and the lovely post-war-built Molde Cathedral. And don’t forget to sample the seafood at one of the town’s many fine restaurants and cafes.

Arrive 0800. Depart 1730.

Destination 3

Tromsø, Norway

Tromsø, Norway

A far northern city that’s the perfect spot for watching the Northern Lights from September through March, Tromso is located about 200 miles north of the Arctic Circle and has long been dubbed the “Gateway to the Arctic”. From May 20 to July 20, it’s truly the Land of the Midnight Sun, with daylight appearing for nearly 24 hours, providing extra time for visitors to enjoy the wealth of activities available there. Hiking, kayaking, fishing, whale watching, dog sledding…it’s all offered in Tromso. Or for those who prefer less-active pursuits, this stunning Norwegian city offers an art museum, the Polar Museum, the magnificent contemporary Arctic Cathedral, the Gothic-Revival Tromso Cathedral, an array of annual festivals, and restaurants featuring a variety of cuisines, thanks to Tromso’s diverse community. For a view of all of it, take the cable car to the top of Mount Storsteinen!

Arrive 0800 on March 7. Depart 1800 on March 8.

Alta

Arrive 0800 on March 9. Depart 1300 on March 10.

Alta, Sweden
People have been attracted to the community of Alta for thousands of years, and prehistoric rock carvings discovered in 1973 can be seen at the Alta Museum. Situated at the head of the Altafjord, it is a lush, green and hospitable shelter in the otherwise cold and windswept Finnmark landscape. Halfway between the grim, barren mountain plateau and the wet, stormy coast, Alta offers tree-clad valleys, pleasant temperatures and no more rain than the Sahara. However at 70 degrees North it is quite a different story in winter, when heavy snowfalls and sub-zero temperatures are the order of the day, and clear dark night skies become the arena for dazzling displays of the elusive Aurora Borealis, also referred to as 'the temperamental lady' by Laplanders. The world’s first Northern Lights Observatory, which played an important role in the development of geophysical and meteorological research during the first half of the 20th century, is located just 12 miles from Alta. Perched atop Haldde Mountain, it towers almost 3,000 feet above Kafjord, where the battleship Tirpitz was based during the Second World War.

Harstad

Situated on the island of Hinnøya, Norway’s largest, Harstad is a natural paradise but also offers plenty of other sightseeing opportunities for visitors. Located above the Arctic Circle, it’s in the center of the so-called Northern Lights Belt and, as such, is a popular spot for viewing the amazing Aurora Borealis. Summertime brings 24 hours of sunlight, 7 days a week for several weeks and a chance to explore the surrounding mountains and waters and to soak in the culture of the city centre. To learn more about Harstad, the Trondenes Historical Centre is a great place to start, with exhibits that profile 1,000 years of regional history. Other highlights include the 1958-built Harstad Church, the 19th century Anna Rogde clipper ship, and a host of timber houses and other charming structures. Foodies will love the fact that the Harstad region is dubbed “the gourmet city of the north”, with restaurants offering a host of locally-grown foods, scrumptious seafood, and regional delicacies like reindeer prepared in a variety of different ways.

Arrive 0800. Depart 1700.

Located in the north-eastern corner of the large island of Hinnøya, north of the Arctic Circle, Harstad is the second-largest town in the county of Troms, after Tromsø. Although the island has been inhabited since the Iron Age, Harstad is a relatively young settlement: it was founded in the 19th century by businessman Rikard Kaarbø and formally incorporated as a town in 1904. It is nicknamed the Pearl of Vågsfjorden (Vågsfjordens Perle): the Vågsfjord is a fjord that separates Harstad from the neighbouring municipality of Ibestad. Among the town’s more interesting sights is the dramatic modern parish church, built of white concrete in 1958 and designed by the architect Jan Inge Hovig. There is also a surprisingly large number of 19th- and early 20th-century timber buildings: it is one of the few towns in this part of Norway that escaped major damage in World War II. Harstad experiences the Midnight Sun every year from May 22 to July 18, and between early May and early August it never gets really dark. On the other hand, the sun is always below the horizon from November 30 to January 12: this is a good period to view the Northern Lights, which can often be seen from here on clear nights. Harstad makes an ideal base for visiting the attractions of Hinnøya. Just outside the town is Trondenes, which has a stone-built parish church dating from 1434 - the most northerly surviving medieval building in the world. To the north-west is the mountain of Nupen, 1,352 feet high. It is also relatively easy to reach the Lofoten and Vesterålen Islands and the Cathedral City of Tromsø.

Ålesund

Far different from most of Norway’s port cities, Ålesund is known for two things: its huge cod-fishing fleet and its incredible collection of Art Nouveau architecture. Considered the most important fishing harbor in Norway, the town boasts a thriving shipbuilding industry but is lauded for its picturesque city centre, which includes structures built mostly between 1904 and 1907, giving it an incredibly consistent look. Begin exploring with an introduction to Art Nouveau architecture at the Jugendstilsenteret, an interpretive center featuring multi-media exhibits, opened in 2003 in one of the city’s premier Art Nouveau buildings. Visitors might also enjoy a visit to the maritime-themed Sunnmøre Museum, the Atlanterhavsparken aquarium, the small but interesting Aalesunds Museum, and the beautiful Ålesund Church, a stone structure built in 1909 and featuring some of the most beautiful frescoes in Norway. Be sure to taste the cod before you leave!

Arrive 0800. Depart 1700.

Ålesund, Norway
Ålesund is the commercial capital of the Møre and Romsdal district and has a distinctive and unique character. It does not look like other Norwegian towns as there are no wooden clapboard buildings around its harbourside – instead, the city is crammed with art nouveau architecture and design. This distinctive look is down to a massive rebuild that took place after a fire devastated the city in 1904, miraculously only one person died but some 10,000 people were left homeless. The rebuilding programme used the style of architecture that was popular at the time and was helped by donations of materials from all over Europe. Although the town was largely spared during the Second World War, as most of the military combat took place at sea, Ålesund was described as ‘Little London’ due to all the illegal resistance activity in the town and because so many managed to escape to England from here.

Flåm

Situated at the inner end of the Aurlandsfjorden, Flam is best known for its natural beauty. Visited by about a half-million travelers per year, the town is the starting point for the Flam Line, a 12.6-mile railway that runs between the town and nearby Myrdal, winding through the picturesque valley of Flamdalen, traveling through 20 tunnels and over one bridge. Stop at the Railway Museum for a little history lesson and learn more about the historic Flam Line.

Arrive 0800. Depart 1700.

Flåm, Norway
The village of Flåm, surrounded by dramatic mountain scenery, lies in the heart of western Norway at the innermost part of Aurlandsfjord, a tributary of the Sognefjord. Tourists come from all over the world to ride on the famous Flåm Railway, which runs up to Myrdal to connect with the main Oslo to Bergen line. A masterpiece of engineering, it offers one of Europe’s most scenic train journeys, passing cascading waterfalls, steep hillsides and snow-capped mountains. Over a distance of less than 13 miles, the track climbs from sea level to approximately 2,850 feet, crossing back and forth over rivers and through 20 tunnels. A museum at the station tells the history of the line. Flåm is also home to the Ægir Microbrewery, located directly on the pier: guided tours and tastings are available. Please bear in mind that the Flåm Railway is very popular and capacity is limited, and therefore any excursions involving a train ride must be booked in advance: these tours will not be available from the Shore Excursions Desk on board ship once the cruise has started.

Interested in our cruises?

Enquire now